Vanity Fair

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ENDOWMENT GRANTS

We have had a bit too much of Shah Rukh Khan this last fortnight. So maybe that is curdling our milk of human kindness. The Khan decided to tell a bad joke while on a British television show and didn’t know when to stop. He said, “You’ve got to see the new body scans at the London airport. It makes you embarrassed — if you’re not well-endowed.” The British produced documents showing that the nude-effect of the new security scans is a figment of Shah Rukh’s imagination and too many video games. Wince.

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RABBIT, HIT, RUN

The saga continues. Kannada’s 2006 romantic hit Mungaru Male (Monsoon Rain) in which the young couple enjoy a ménage-à-trois with a white-furred, red-eyed rabbit is now about to be remade into Tamil and Hindi. The hare has run successfully in Bengali and not so much in Telugu. Gloriously unconfirmed and wild rumours say that Santosh Sivan has bought the rights for the film in Hindi and that Imran Khan will play the lead.

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SMALL FEARS

Aditya Narayan, son of singer Udit Narayan is 22. Got that? He’s 22. That child. How time has flown. And so on. Of course he wants to become an actor. Instead of doing a regular star son launch he is doing Vikram Bhatt’s third horror film Shaapit. Young Aditya goes in search of a 300- year-old curse, hunts out an evil spirit and presumably vanquishes it. Aditya already has one ghostbusting tactic sorted. He has a looped interview spiel in which he keeps urging people to take a look at his six-pack.

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BOSS OF ME

When you hear the phrase ‘India’s first writer-led band’ in endless press releases what do you think? Mostly you don’t think. There is Amit Chaudhuri with his band This is Not Fusion but his press releases would not be so clumsy. Eventually we figured what the paper blizzard was about. A dude called Neelesh Mishra, a writer and lyricist has joined hit playback singer Shilpa Rao and young Abhishek Naiwal to create a band called Nine. Nine performed at the Kala Ghoda festival recently. And Neelesh Mishra has now let the world know that he leads the band. “Our primary attraction will be Hindi songs penned by me.” Yes, we can see that.

Compiled by NISHA SUSAN

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Psychologies

‘I Would Love To Play Albert Ponto’

IMAAD SHAH, Actor

 

Imaad Shah, Actor

What is your earliest memory?
My earliest concrete memory is of being backstage. I spent a lot of time in the wings watching people in transit, missing entries, peeing in bottles and going through all sorts of chaos! The peculiar smell of the wings will be dear to me all my life. That, and the image of my daadi ammi doing namaaz.

Where did you grow up?
I grew up in Mumbai and Dehradun but travelled a lot with my parents. I remember an old Parsi man who lived near my house in Mumbai and listened to really loud opera music every morning because he was going deaf.

Do you believe in happy endings?
No I don’t believe in the concept of happy endings, because its boring to think of anything as a final ending. Happiness or unhappiness — it is the combination of these things that makes life worthwhile and interesting

At what phase of your life do you feel you truly came of age?
Studying in three different colleges and getting expelled from all of them as well as from my school definitely had something to do with it. Refusing big-budget commercial films to do a film like Dil, Dosti, Etc was also a huge learning process, in terms of understanding how the film industry works and the balance (or imbalance) of power involved in the process. I didn’t really relate to the character because it was too broadly written, but we are both silent observers of human nature and love wandering around the nether regions of the city on our bikes.

Which role essayed by your father would you love to portray?
I love Mustafa Mastana from Bombay Boys, and I would love to play Albert Pinto.

What can we expect from you next?
I’m working on recording and producing a lot of songs that I’ve been writing. Our band The Pulp Society has been travelling and performing a lot. A few of my films will be released this year — mostly by low-budget, independent production houses, but with very tight and interesting scripts. I’m also working on trying to make my own films in which I hope to capture the idiosyncrasies of our mad country in a wry, humorous, and forever affectionate way. I am a huge patriot!

NISHITA JHA

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