The last relics of a Cinema Past

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There was once a time when the experience of watching a film in the movie hall meant a long wait before the ticket counters, nudging elbows that were bound to come when the counter opens and finally, throwing away the long wait to relish cinema, with a crowd cutting across classes. Gone are those days and gone is that experience. Today, we are embraced by a sanitised ‘time’ well-spent at the movie hall, nourished with food and refreshments. However, in Mamura village, in Noida, the single screen theater, Satyam Palace, is not ready to make its exit yet. Unlike palaces which are imagined to be richly decorated, Satyam Palace is an antonym to its name. An old and dilapidated building, painted in fading brick colour, the hall quenches the thirst for cinema among slum dwellers. Hailing from Bihar and UP, these people who are primarily migrant workers find in the hall, a space to socialise and dream together. Running daily shows at Rs 15, the hall, owing to its regulars, have also been screening a Bhojpuri film once a day.


Superstar Mithun Chakraborty sets the screen on fire for his enthusiasts
Superstar Mithun Chakraborty sets the screen on fire for his enthusiasts
Movie posters are neatly stacked on the ground before they are put up
Movie posters are neatly stacked on the ground before they are put up
Amidst the damp and the muck, a cinema hall stands tall
Amidst the damp and the muck, a cinema hall stands tall
A poster of Sanjay Dutt starrer Kurukshetra is being put up on the wall before the daily show
A poster of Sanjay Dutt starrer Kurukshetra is being put up on the wall before the daily show
Priced at 15, the movie tickets are affordable to the slum-dwellers who are migrant labourers
Priced at Rs.15, the movie tickets are affordable to the slum-dwellers who are migrant labourers

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