Mastertakes

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Remains of the day An image by Raghu Rai
Remains of the day An image by Raghu Rai

Sanjay Nanda on Art

Photography as an art form inIndiahas a long way to go, but the way photojournalist Raghu Rai’s work documents the country and its people is commendable. Rai juxtaposes the human element with the environment in the starkest possible manner. There is an instant connection between the subject of the photograph and his surrounding. Earlier, while working for the print media, Rai’s works were largely in black and white, but he shifted to digital coloured photography later. The technical aspects of the photographs are simple yet sharp, letting the content stand on its own and create the maximum impact on the viewer.

Nanda is the owner of Indipix Gallery, New Delhi

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Jahnavi Barua on Books

Alice Munro’s work deals with the quotidian, with the everyday lives of ordinary people. She writes skillfully about the subterranean currents that run underneath the surface of human lives, challenging the reader to explore what is not said and not easily seen, as is evident in her collection of short stories, Too Much Happiness. The complexity in her work is played against her seemingly simple language.

‘Munro deals with the quotidian, challenging the reader to explore the unsaid’

Barua is the author of  Next Door

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One for all Ustad Zakir Hussain
One for all Ustad Zakir Hussain

Ujwal Nagar on Music

Every time Ustad Zakir Hussain performs, he seems to have grown. His music is never monotonous. The tabla virtuoso, composer and percussionist has taken Indian classical music to a global platform, appreciated by the masses and critics alike. His mastery of the tabla lends itself to international collaborations of all kinds. Apart from concerts and jugalbandis, he has contributed to film soundtracks for Francis Ford Coppola and Bernardo Bertolucci among others.

Nagar is a vocalist for the Delhi band Advaita

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The evil that men do A still from Blue Velvet
The evil that men do A still from Blue Velvet

Abhishek Chaubey on Film

David Lynch’s cinematic vision lies in his mastery over the macabre and the dark, as manifested in Blue Velvet. The film depicts how evil resides in close proximity with good. The story of a young college boy investigates the ugly and murky undercurrents that exist in a beautiful suburban neighbourhood. The movie explores the mysterious through brilliant acting. The theme of violence, with strong sexual undertones, is disturbingly graphic. Yet Lynch keeps the film meaningful, instead of titillating.

Chaubey is the director of Ishqiya

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Manoj Rai on Food

Kothi Mem at Rajouri Garden specialises in Indian food, particularly the Indian frontier cuisine from Punjab to Delhi and moving on to Awadhi and other parts of north India. Though it has mastery over Indian cuisine, the ‘Mem’ in its name is attached as an attempt to Anglicise the ambience. I recommend the kebab combo platter and the fish curry. The combo platter includes a variety of spicy meat such as lamb, chicken tikka and so on. My personal favourite in this platter is the sharabi tikka, which is chicken tikka marinated in liquor.

Rai is a corporate chef at Pind Balluchi

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