‘I get inspired by simple things with profound lessons’

0
68
Pragnya Wakhlu,  31, Musician
Pragnya Wakhlu, 31, Musician

What prompted this drastic shift from it to music?
I worked with Infosys for three years. While working in Bengaluru, I would often look out the window and wish I could just be with nature and wasn’t bound by my work hours. Then, a theatre-loving colleague told me, “If you want to pursue a career in the arts, quit before you start earning too much.” So, that’s what I did. I wanted to combine my passion of working with music and people to make a difference in society.

Where do you find the inspiration for your music?
I get inspired by simple things with profound lessons. Like the bumble bee’s ability to fly. Although the bumble bee is aerodynamically unable to fly (according to the laws of physics), it still takes flight, because no one told it that it couldn’t. This inspired my song Flying High.

The physicist Nicola Tesla says everything in this world is either vibration or energy or frequency. How true is this in the context of music?
Every word, every object, every cell in our body is pure vibrational energy. Music  and words, when combined, have the power to influence you at an emotional and physical level.

What made you delve into music as therapy, as a healing medium?
Initially, a dance therapist friend and I researched the transformative powers of music and movement in Pune. We conducted experiments and came up with various exercises. I found myself letting go of my inhibitions, feeling more open and liberated. Later, we found the participants much happier and liberated too. Basically, your body responds to everything it experiences in the environment you surround it with; that includes music as therapy.

Tell us about the musicians who inspired you and why.
I admire the work of Tracy Chapman, Coldplay, John Lennon and Bob Dylan, whose songs are treated simply, yet are bursting with meaning. I like KT Tunstall and admire Adele for her stellar voice. She has proven that you don’t need to objectify yourself as a woman to sell music.

SHALINI RAI

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Comment moderation is enabled. Your comment may take some time to appear.